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25 Jan 14:57

About our Golliwogs news

Latest news on golliwogs, a type of doll-like character that originated in children's books in the late 19th century, created by cartoonist and author Florence Kate Upton. They were usually depicted as a type of rag doll with jet black skin, eyes rimmed in white, exaggerated red lips and frizzy hair, resembling a blackface minstrel tradition. They were later reproduced as children's toys called "golliwogs" or "gollys", and had great popularity in some countries until the 1970s.

Golliwogs in the UK are seen as a controversial and offensive symbol of racism by many people, especially black people and anti-racism activists. They are considered to be a derogatory representation of black people, based on the blackface minstrel tradition.

However, some people in the UK still insist on defending their right to display or collect golliwogs, claiming that they are an innocuous toy associated with childhood and nostalgic memories. They argue that the original golliwog character created by Florence Kate Upton was a friendly and gallant figure, and that the dolls are not intended to be racist or hurtful.

The display or sale of golliwogs in the UK can be considered a hate crime or an offence against public order, depending on the context and intention of the person involved. There have been several cases of police seizing golliwogs from pubs or shops after receiving complaints from the public. Manufacturers who have used golliwogs as a motif, such as Robertson's marmalade, have either withdrawn them as an icon or changed the name due to public pressure and changing attitudes towards race.


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