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About our Hizb ut-Tahrir news

Latest news on Hizb ut-Tahrir, a transnational Islamist movement founded in 1953 in Jerusalem by Taqiuddin al-Nabhani, an Islamic scholar and appeals court judge. The central objective of the group is to re-establish the Islamic Caliphate, a single Islamic state under Sharia law, by peaceful means. It aims to unite all Muslim countries under this Caliphate, with the belief that it's a religious obligation for all Muslims.

Recent events surrounding Hizb ut-Tahrir in the UK have stirred significant controversy and called for governmental intervention. A demonstration by Hizb ut-Tahrir in London, notably featuring chants of 'Allahu Akbar' and 'jihad, jihad, jihad', has drawn attention to the group's ideologies and activities. The protest was orchestrated outside the embassies of Egypt and Turkey in central London and voiced a demand for these countries to mobilize their armies against Israel. The cries for 'jihad' during the rally have evoked concern and ignited discussions on potentially banning the group in the UK, similar to the ban already in place in Germany.

Following the demonstration, Suella Braverman, the Home Secretary, alongside the government and Scotland Yard, has been urged to consider banning Hizb ut-Tahrir from operating in the UK..

Additionally, the Metropolitan Police released a statement on the Hizb ut-Tahrir Britain protest, noting a review of a video from the protest where 'jihad, jihad' was chanted. However, the statement mentioned that no offences were identified during the rally, which marched from Marble Arch to Whitehall showing solidarity to Palestine.


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